Is My Child Charged With a Delinquent Offense or Status Offense?

When a child under the age of 18 years old is arrested or breaks the law, they are entered into the juvenile court system. There, they will face a series of legal procedures, obligations, penalties, and ultimately, a conviction. Their conviction, however, largely depends on whether they are charged with a delinquent offense or a status offense.

If your child was recently arrested, it is important to learn the difference between the two types of offenses. Not only can this help you better understand what to expect from the juvenile court proceedings, it can also help you protect your child from future brushes with the law.

Continue reading to learn the difference between a delinquent offense and a status offense.

Juvenile Crime Lawyer 317-636-7514
Juvenile Crime Lawyer 317-636-7514

Status Offenses

Status offenses are special because they can only be committed by people of a certain status. This does not mean wealth or intellect; instead, it refers to age. A status offense is only illegal for those who are underage, also known as minors. A minor is someone that is not old enough to partake in a certain behavior or action.

For example, a person under 16 years of age cannot operate a vehicle, a person under the age of 18 cannot smoke or purchase cigarettes, and a person under the age of 21 cannot consume nor purchase alcohol. All three of these individuals are considered “minors”, which means they would commit a status offense if they are caught partaking in any of the actions just mentioned.

Additional Examples of Status Offenses:

✤ Truancy

✤ Curfew Violations

✤ Running Away From Home

Delinquent Offenses

Delinquent offense are different from status offenses, primarily because they are crimes that can be committed by individuals of any age. Basically, both minors and adults can commit delinquent offenses. Examples of such crimes include shoplifting, operating a vehicle without a license, drunk driving, fraud, assault, vandalism, and any other action that is against state and federal laws. Minors who commit delinquent offenses are more likely to face harsher penalties.

Most often, less serious cases will result in an informal plan of probation; but more serious offenses can lead to a minor having to go before a judge and being sentenced to a juvenile detention center. If a minor is near 18 years old and commits an egregious crime, such as murder, they may be prosecuted as an adult. Check out our recent blog, “How Does the Juvenile Court System Work?” to learn more about juvenile court.

Who to Talk to About Your Child’s Case

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514
David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call David E. Lewis, Attorney at Law, at 317-636-7514 for aggressive and experienced criminal defense in Indianapolis, Indiana. Our law firm offers free initial consultations to discuss the best strategies for defense against your child’s criminal charges. Call 317-636-7514 to schedule your consultation with a trusted Indianapolis criminal lawyer, today.

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Should I Take a Police Lie Detector Test?

Law enforcement investigators utilize a variety of resources and methods to get the truth from suspects in question. One of the most popular tools they use is a lie detector test. If you are facing serious criminal charges,especially for felony crimes, you may be asked by police to take a lie detector test. Would you say acquiesce? Or would you refuse?

Continue reading to learn what you need to know about police lie detector tests, including advice on whether or not you should take one.

Indianapolis Criminal Defense 317-636-7514

Indianapolis Criminal Defense 317-636-7514

Polygraphs

Lie detector tests, also known as polygraphs, measure human vitals as a person answers a series of straightforward questions. Supporters of polygraph testing believe that these tests can detect the physical effects of lying, such as perspiration, blood pressure, heart rate, breathing, and more. But are these tests really accurate?

There is really no way to be sure of polygraph accuracy since there are so many variables that can affect the results of a test, such as instructor experience, the format of questions being asked, the style in which the results are interpreted, and more.

Furthermore, being tested in such a way adds stress in itself; a person could be telling the truth, but the test will measure their words as a lie simply because they are nervous. So it is very difficult, if not impossible, to distinguish between physical changes that come from lying and those that come from being under the scrutiny of such tests.

Lie Detector Evidence

Basically, lie detector tests do not confirm whether or not a suspect is being dishonest, but rather, whether or not there is a possibility that they are being dishonest. Since lie detector tests do not meet the standards of dependability obligatory for scientific evidence, such results are typically inadmissible as evidence in a court of law.

To Agree or Not to Agree

Back to the original question of whether or not you should agree to take a polygraph when asked by police, the answer is always, NO. Always say “no” when asked to take a lie detector test. Instead, you must always consult with your Indianapolis criminal defense attorney before answering any police questions.

Indianapolis Criminal Defense Near You

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514
David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call Attorney David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation to discuss your criminal charges with a seasoned Indianapolis criminal defense attorney you can trust. We work around the clock to ensure your rights are protected and your freedoms are preserved. You can avoid the maximum penalties for your charges with our aggressive legal representation!

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How Does the Juvenile Court System Work?

If your minor child is in trouble with the law, both of you can expect to endure a mandatory series of legal obligations in the juvenile court system. Continue reading to learn more about minors who break the law, and what the juvenile courts are like.

Juvenile Criminal Defense

Indianapolis Juvenile Criminal Defense 317-636-7514

Minors vs. Juveniles

You may be confused by the terms, “minors” and “juveniles” since they are very similar in meaning. Basically, a minor is anyone who is prohibited from certain activities due to their age. This includes consuming alcohol, smoking cigarettes, driving a car, voting, and similar activities. For example, a person who is under the age of 21 is considered a minor in the eyes of the law.

In contrast, the term “juvenile” is more specific. A juvenile is anyone between the ages of 10 and 17 years old, and who has not been emancipated from legal guardians. When a person turns 18, the law deems them a legal adult, however, they can still be a minor, as shown in the example before. Children under 10 years old are not tried in the juvenile court system if they commit a crime. Instead, they are enrolled into a state social services program to be evaluated and rehabilitated by professionals.

Juvenile Court Facts

After committing a crime, a juvenile will be detained in a state or county juvenile detention center, much like a county jail. Their experience from there will depend mostly on the type of crime they are charged with, as well as, various other behavioral and historical factors. When referred to juvenile court, a couple different situations can occur. A juvenile may enter into an informal deal that includes probation rather than seeing a judge; or they may have to go in front of a judge, who in turn, may dismiss their case, order them to probation, or send them to the Department of Correction.

Judges also have the discretion to order juveniles to additional mandatory terms, such as therapy, community service, mentoring, life coaching, school, drug rehabilitation, or admittance into an in-patient psychiatric facility. In fact, it is very common for judges to use these additional penalties in juvenile criminal cases.

Your Child’s Rights

In the juvenile court system, a child has several rights. They include, but are not limited to:

The right to a lawyer or public defender;
The right to know the date and time of all hearings;
The right to attend all hearings;
The right to know what information the judge has on their case;
The right to question witnesses;
The right to know the criminal charges against them;
The right to refuse to tell anyone, including the judge, what happened;
The right to give the judge information, have other people give information, and then make arguments;
The right to make the state prove the case against them;
The right to have a trial within 20 days if held in custody, or 60 business days if released;

Indiana Juvenile Criminal Defense

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call Attorney David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation to discuss the best course of action for your juvenile’s criminal case with a seasoned Indianapolis criminal defense attorney you can trust. We work around the clock to ensure your juvenile’s rights are protected and your freedoms are preserved. You can avoid the maximum penalties for your charges with our aggressive legal representation!

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What is an FBI Identity History Summary?

If you want your full federal criminal record report, you can pay the FBI a small fee for something called an Identity History Summary.

Criminal Record Expungement 317-636-7514

Criminal Record Expungement 317-636-7514

Identity History Summaries

An Identity History Summary is simply a criminal record. Informally, it is known as a person’s rap sheet. This report contains any and all information kept by the federal government, including any criminal and non-criminal related fingerprint data. Non-criminal data may include information regarding federal employment, naturalization, or military service. Criminal-related items of information on such reports will include arrests, the name of arresting agencies, charges, convictions, disposition reports, and more.

How To Get One

The only person who can request an identity history check or challenge is the person themselves. Whether you wish to have a copy of your criminal history, or you need to prove that one does not exist for you, the only person who can request it is you. For example, you cannot request this report for your child, your spouse, or an elderly parent.

Where to Get an Identity History Summary

The U.S. Department of Justice Order 556-73, or Departmental Order, has a set schedule of rules and regulations for obtaining an identity history summary. To begin, you will need to request an Applicant Information Form on the official FBI website. From there, you need to complete their Standard Fingerprint Form and pay a processing fee to the FBI CJIS Division in Clarksburg, West Virginia. After you fill out all the forms, you will send them via mail to the FBI. You may also electronically submit your request.

Do You Have Questions About Your Criminal Record?

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call David E. Lewis, Attorney at Law, at 317-636-7514 to learn your eligibility for Indiana criminal record expungement and restricted access. Our criminal defense law firm offers free initial consultations to do just that! That means no out-of-pocket charges to see if you qualify! And rates start as low as $850 of those who do! Call 317-636-7514 to schedule your consultation for criminal record expungement, today.

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How to Avoid a DUI After Drinking Craft Beer

Breweries are a popular trend that is continuing to expand all across the city and state. In fact, there are more than 160 craft beer breweries here in Indianapolis alone! If you plan on enjoying some specially-crafted beers on your next night out, there are some important considerations you need to know first.

Continue reading to learn why craft beers pose a certain danger on the road, and what you can do to avoid such trouble in the future.

Indianapolis Drunk Driving Attorney 317-636-7514

Indianapolis Drunk Driving Attorney 317-636-7514

Craft vs. Draft

Back in the day, most people drank draft beers, such as Coors™ or Budweiser™, since those were the primary options available on tap at the local bars. But now, beer-drinking patrons have the option of choosing from a vast selection of local breweries, whose owners craft their own unique styles of beer. As for comparing drafts to crafts, the major differences are fermentation style, taste, and price. However, one critical difference that is commonly overlooked is alcohol content. This happens to also play a major role in terms of drunk driving.

Craft Beers and Alcohol By Volume

Traditional draft beers, like Budweiser™ and Miller Light™, have a much lower Alcohol By Volume (ABV) content than the average craft beer. Draft beers range between 4 and 6 percent alcohol content, whereas craft beers can range between 7 and 18 percent alcohol content. So what does this mean for your next night out? It means that you should not drive home after consuming more than 1 craft beer.

For example, the Four Day Ray Brewery in Fishers offers a craft beer on tap called FALA Scotch Ale, which has an ABV of 7.8% per pint. They offer another called Grapefruit Track Jumper IPA India Pale Ale, which has an ABV of 6.8% per pint. Similarly, Mashcraft Brewing in Greenwood carries a Double IPA called 18th Street Overlords Revenge that has an ABV of 8% per pint.

Avoiding DUI’s

If you are a craft beer drinker, you should understand that the risk of being arrested on a drunk driving charge is much higher because they will get you more drunk than traditional beers on tap. For instance, the popular “1 drink per hour” rule would not work the same with craft beers as it would with domestic beers. One or two domestic beers might keep you within the legal limits to drive, but the same amount of craft beers will likely render you intoxicated under state law.

In Indiana, a Blood Alcohol Content (BAC) of 0.08% or more is strictly illegal. If you are pulled over by police, and your breathalyzer test reads more than 0.08 percent, you will be arrested on drunk driving charges. To avoid a DUI, be sure to inquire about ABV’s and keep track of how much you drink. Also, imagine that for each craft beer you drink, it is equal to two or three. When in doubt, even just a little, call a ride.

***In Indiana, a criminal defense attorney has only 10 days to save your driving privileges. So if you are facing DUI charges from a recent arrest, you need to get in touch with a licensed crime lawyer ASAP!

An Indianapolis DUI Lawyer You Can Trust

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call Attorney David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 for aggressive DUI criminal defense in Indianapolis, Indiana. Our law firm offers free initial consultations to discuss the best strategies of defense for your case. Avoid the maximum penalties for your misdemeanor criminal charges by calling David E. Lewis, Attorney at Law, today!

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What Constitutes Credit Card Fraud?

Perhaps you have borrowed your husband’s debit card and purchased some new appliances for the home, or you found a lost credit card and used it to fill up the gas tank in your car? If so, it is possible that you may have committed a form of credit card fraud, of course, it is also possible that you have not. It all depends on the circumstances and the particular actions taken.

To clear up your doubts or concerns, continue reading to learn exactly what constitutes as credit card fraud in Indiana, and who to call if you are currently facing such criminal charges.

Indianapolis Fraud Lawyer 317-636-7514

Indianapolis Fraud Lawyer 317-636-7514

There are Many Forms of Credit Fraud

With the prevalence and popularity of debit and credit cards these days, it is rare to find a person who does not own or use at least one. However, with all of the advancements in technology, particularly wireless and computer innovations, it is easier than ever for someone to commit credit or debit card fraud. In fact, there are thousands of ways to fraudulently use a credit or debit card, in which case, you may be worried if you have done so yourself.

Credit card fraud comes in many forms. For instance, a thief can physically steal another person’s credit card and use it at their own discretion; someone can steal a person’s identity and open up credit cards in their name for personal use; a hacker can steal a person’s PIN directly from their own computer and access their bank accounts; or someone can use an electronic card-skimming device, whether at the checkout line or public bus, to steal credit card information.

What Indiana Law Says

In Indiana, if a person who is not an unauthorized user of a credit or debit card makes transactions with said card, they can be charged with credit card fraud. Here is what is considered credit card fraud under Indiana Code § 35-43-5-4:

Credit Card Fraud Occurs When a Person Intentionally:

⇁ Falsely claims to be an authorized user of another person’s credit or debit card;
⇁ Uses another person’s credit or debit card without permission or proper authorization;
⇁ Uses another person’s credit card knowing that it was stolen or obtained unlawfully;
⇁ Uses a credit card with the knowledge that it is expired, or was forged or revoked;
⇁ Sells a credit card without being an official issuer;
⇁ Falsely claims to be the authorized user before the card is actually issued;

✣ ✣ It is also illegal to own a credit card skimming device.

See Indiana Code Sections 35-43-5-4 and 35-43-5-4.3

Penalties for Fraudulent Credit Card Use

Regardless of how it occurs, credit card fraud is against the law, and if caught, a person faces a long list of possible penalties, such as jail time, probation, community service, restitution, and fines. In Indiana, credit card fraud is a felony. Depending on the unique circumstances of the case, and various other factors, an offender can be convicted of a Level 5 or Level 6 felony. Here are the standard penalties for each:

Level 5 Felony = 1 to 6 years in jail and fines up to $10,000.
Level 6 Felony = 6 months to 2 ½ years in jail and fines up to $10,000.

Facing Fraud Charges in Indiana?

Criminal Defense Lawyer Indianapolis Indiana

Criminal Defense Lawyer 317-636-7514

Call the Law Office of David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation and case evaluation with a licensed Indiana criminal defense lawyer you can trust. During this meeting, which is free of charge, you have the opportunity to sit down with Attorney David E. Lewis and discuss your Indiana credit card fraud charges and the best strategies for your defense. Start as soon as today!

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What is the Preemption Doctrine?

If you are facing criminal charges for an act that is legal under one jurisdiction, but illegal under another, you may want to review the Constitution’s Preemption Doctrine. It can help you better understand your situation, and perhaps even develop a stronger defense to avoid the maximum penalties if ultimately convicted.

Continue reading to learn about the Preemption Doctrine, and how it may apply to your criminal case.

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

The Preemption Doctrine

The Preemption Doctrine stems from the United States Constitution. It is specifically derived from the Supremacy Clause, which states, “Constitution and the laws of the United States (…) shall be the supreme law of the land (…) anything in the constitutions or laws of any state to the contrary notwithstanding.”

So what does this mean in common language? It means that any federal law can override any conflicting state law. Basically, states cannot pass any laws that violate our rights outlined in the U.S. Constitution, otherwise, federal judiciaries can overturn the law for being unconstitutional. On the other hand, there are some exceptions.

You see, if any law provides citizens more rights or imposes more responsibility, such law will prevail. But if state and federal laws blatantly conflict with one another, we go back to the Supremacy Clause which states that federal law will always prevail. Here are some examples that will help you understand who it works:

If a certain law provides citizens more rights, that law will override the opposing jurisdiction. For instance, if state law allows same-sex marriage, but federal law does not, the state law will trump.

If a certain law imposes more responsibility onto citizens, that law will trump the opposing one. For instance, if the state law requires seat belts, but the federal law does not, the state law will prevail.

If state and federal law explicitly conflict, federal law will prevail. For instance, if state law allows cannabis use, but federal law does not, anyone caught in possession of cannabis will be arrested and charged.

Facing Criminal Charges Based on Conflicting State and Federal Laws?

David E. Lewis Criminal Defense Attorney

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

What you need is aggressive and skilled legal defense. Call 317-636-7514 to schedule a consultation with aggressive Indiana criminal defense attorney, David E. Lewis, who will stop at nothing to protect your rights and preserve your freedoms. With decades of hands-on experience, you can trust Attorney David E. Lewis to build you a strong and impactful defense against your criminal charges. Call 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation for Indianapolis criminal defense, today.

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Can I Still Get Arrested Even if I Was Not the One Committing a Crime?

In life, regardless of age, you must choose your peers wisely. That is because the short answer to the question, “Can I Still Get Arrested Even if I Was Not the One Committing a Crime?” is yes. It is true that your presence alone could be enough to get you arrested and charged with a crime, even if you are innocent. You see, there are such offenses that permit law enforcement to arrest anyone who is in a “place of common nuisance.” The criminal charge for being present in a place of common nuisance is aptly referred to as, “visiting a common nuisance.” Furthermore, there is even a crime referred to as, “maintaining a common nuisance.”

Continue reading to learn more about these offenses, what to look out for, and how to avoid the maximum penalties for such criminal charges.

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

A Place of Common Nuisance

A “place of common nuisance” is considered to be any private property in which illegal activity is actively taking place. A place of common nuisance can be any structure, including houses, vehicles, apartments, hotel rooms, boats, and any other privately-owned residence. The most common types of crimes that occur in a place of common nuisance are the consumption and selling of illegal substances and paraphernalia. This includes street drugs, stolen merchandise, firearms, and medication.

Visiting a Place of Common Nuisance

Anyone person who knowingly attends a place of common nuisance is committing a crime, and if caught, can be charged with the offense of “visiting a common nuisance.” Individuals can be arrested and charged with this crime without actually taking part in any illegal activity. Here is an example:

A girl begins dating a new guy, and visits his apartment for the first time. He lives with two other male roommates. His roommates sell illegal drugs and partake in drug use at the apartment at all times. If she were to be visiting her boyfriend’s apartment while police show up, she too could be arrested just for being somewhere where illegal activity is taking place. This rings true even if she did not partake in any drug usage or trafficking.

Maintaining a Common Nuisance

If a person permits someone, or a group of people, to partake in illegal activity in their own home or vehicle, they can be charged with “maintaining a common nuisance.” Imagining the same scenario as before, the boyfriend can be charged with maintaining a common nuisance for allowing his roommates to sell and use illegal drugs in the home. Similarly, if the girl lets her new boyfriend use drugs in her apartment, she could be arrested and charged with maintaining a common nuisance. The same applies to parents who allow their children to drink underage or use drugs in their home.

Facing Criminal Charges in Indiana?

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call 317-636-7514 to schedule a consultation with aggressive Indiana criminal defense lawyer, David E. Lewis. He will stop at nothing to protect your rights and preserve your freedoms. With decades of hands-on experience, you can trust Attorney David E. Lewis to build you a strong and impactful defense against your criminal charges. Call 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation for Indianapolis criminal defense, today.

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What You Need to Know About Misdemeanor Charges

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal acts range in severity, from minor infractions to major offenses, which is why the law breaks down crimes into two chief categories: felonies and misdemeanors. Anyone convicted of a misdemeanor crime is called a misdemeanant, whereas anyone convicted of a felony is called a felon. Felonies are the more serious of the two, as they include major crimes like murder, forgery, tax evasion, robbery, auto theft, and repeat offenses. Misdemeanors on the other hand are less severe than felonies, but still carry a cumbersome load of consequences and legal penalties.

If you or a loved one were recently arrested on misdemeanor charges, it is wise to do your research and learn what to expect in all the possible outcomes. Continue reading to learn some important information about misdemeanor convictions and penalties in Indiana, including where to find the most aggressive criminal defense.

Misdemeanor Classifications

Misdemeanor offenses are crimes that are punishable by up to one year in jail. There are three “classes” of misdemeanor crimes. Depending on the state you live, these can include a series of letters or numbers. In states that classify misdemeanors with letters, they generally range from “A” to “C”, with Class C misdemeanors being the least serious and Class A being the most serious. In states that use numbers to classify their misdemeanors, they generally range from Class 1 to 4, with four being the least serious.

Misdemeanant Expectations

Even though misdemeanors are less serious, but still come with notable penalties. A misdemeanant (person convicted of a misdemeanor) can expect to pay fines (possibly restitution as well), complete a certain amount of community service hours, complete rehabilitation or anger management classes, attend victim impact panels, serve a term of probation, and more. The combination or extent of penalties largely depends on the defendant’s criminal history, the particular crimes they are convicted of, and the strength of their legal defense.

Misdemeanor Probation

Probation is a very common outcome of a misdemeanor conviction. The average term of probation generally ranges between 3 months and one year for misdemeanants. Conditions of probation also vary among misdemeanants, ranging in leniency and stringency. Most conditions of probation include regular drug screening, monthly meetings with a probation officer, mandatory employment, refraining from committing any more crimes, and more. Breaking the terms of probation results in a probation violation, which in turn, carries a whole other set of penalties, including extension of probation and even possible jail time.

Indianapolis Misdemeanor Lawyer

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call Attorney David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation to discuss your Indiana misdemeanor criminal charges. We work around the clock to ensure your rights are protected and your freedoms are preserved. You can avoid the maximum penalties for your charges with our aggressive legal representation! Call 317-636-7514 to get started, today.

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Can I Get Arrested for CBD Oil?

Although there are many United States local governments that have legalized medical and/or recreational cannabis use under state law, Indiana is not yet one of them. However, on July 1st earlier this year, the Indiana General Assembly did approve the possession and usage of cannabidiol oil, more commonly known as CBD oil, for recreational use or dietary consumption under Indiana Code (IC) 35-48-1-17.5.

So it can’t get you in trouble with the law anymore, right? WRONG. Continue reading to learn why.

Indianapolis OWI Attorney 317-636-7514

Indianapolis OWI Attorney 317-636-7514

It is Legal to Have CBD Products, However

So what does this mean in common language? Well, it is now legal to possess “low THC hemp extract” products, such as CBD oil or those that contain it, which the state defines as, “products that are derived from Cannabis sativa L.”, or contain no more than 0.3% delta-9-THC (including precursors).” Such products that fit this description are no longer considered controlled substances in the eyes of Indiana.

BEWARE: Indiana is a Metabolite State

With this new legal language in place for Hoosiers, you can have CBD oil products on your person without the risk of any legal prosecution. However, this does not mean you are in the clear. You see, Indiana is known as a “Metabolite State” when it comes to OWI charges. Basically, if a person is arrested under the suspicious of operating a vehicle while intoxicated, they may be given a blood test to confirm their alcohol toxicity levels. If the person’s blood work shows any metabolites (leftover traces) of a foreign substance with an observable drug-based chemistry, they can be charged with a DUI with a controlled substance (or its metabolite). This includes cannabidiol oil.

What’s the Penalty for Such a Charge?

Under IC 9-30-5-1, a person charged with an OWI with a controlled substance or its metabolite may face a Class C Misdemeanor, which includes up to 60 days in jail and fines of up to $500. Even in the case that the discovered metabolite in their blood is an inactive compound (or a type that wouldn’t cause intoxication if it were in their system), a defendant can still be charged and convicted of the crime.

Facing DUI or Drug Possession Charges in Indiana?

If you are facing DUI or drug possession charges, you need a skilled Indianapolis criminal defense attorney working your case. Although you can choose to use a public defender, a stronger chance at dismissing criminal charges or entering into alternative sentencing agreements is by hiring a licensed defense lawyer. They have the experience, litigation skills, and acute knowledge of the law to effectively build a defense that challenges your criminal allegations and pursue a more favorable outcome for your case.

How to Get Started on Your Defense

David E. Lewis Criminal Defense Attorney

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call the Law Office of David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation and case evaluation. During this meeting, which is free of charge, you have the opportunity to sit down with Attorney David E. Lewis and discuss your Indiana criminal charges and the best strategies for your defense. Call as soon as today!

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