Do I Withdraw My Plea or File an Appeal?

After receiving a guilty conviction, the process of protesting it varies depending on various factors. For instance, if you do not go to trial, but plead guilty or no contest, you cannot appeal your guilty conviction. Instead, you would have to motion for a plea withdraw. In contrast, if you do go to trial and a jury finds you guilty, you can appeal the conviction. Continue reading to learn more about withdrawing a plea and filing an appeal, and the differences between them both.

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Filing an Appeal

To file an appeal, you must have been found guilty by a judge or jury at trial. Filing an appeal is basically asking for a new trial. Defendants would need to hire a specialized criminal defense attorney known as an appellate lawyer. An appellate law firm practice focuses primarily on appealing convictions.

Withdrawing a Plea

To protest and turn over a guilty conviction that resulted out of a plea agreement, you would not file an appeal. Instead, you would have your criminal defense lawyer file a motion to withdraw your plea. This is an entirely separate process than the appellate court system.

Writ of Habeas Corpus

A writ of habeas corpus is a limited indirect appeal that allows you to protest your conviction without technically withdrawing your plea. Filing a writ of habeas corpus is only permitted in some states, and can only be pursed under very specific circumstances. Usually, this results when important information is withheld that, had you known at the time, would have influenced your original plea. This process is actually very similar to the appeals process.

Keep in mind that filing any appeal or motion does not guarantee that your conviction will be overturned, or that you will be cleared or acquitted of your charges. It is important to have a skilled and experienced Indianapolis criminal defense lawyer on your side, working your case and fighting for your rights.

Indianapolis Criminal Defense Lawyer

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call David E. Lewis, Attorney at Law, at 317-636-7514 to get the aggressive Indianapolis criminal defense you need to avoid the maximum penalties for your charges in Indiana. We offer free initial consultations to discuss your charges and the best strategies for defense. Don’t fall victim to the maximum penalties for your criminal charges. Let our law firm fight for your rights and protect your freedoms.

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How Does the U.S. Constitution Protect Our Basic Rights in the Criminal Justice Process?

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Every citizen of the United States enters the criminal justice system following an arrest. What is the criminal justice process exactly? It is all the procedures and obligations that take place from the time a person is suspected of committing a crime, through the time of their prosecution, and all the way to the completion of their case. Generally, it involves arrests, indictments, and a series of hearings, including preliminary hearings, arraignments, trials, and appeals. It can also extend past sentencing and appeals in the form of probation, jail time, and parole.

The U.S. Constitution and Due Process

The U.S. Constitution provides certain protections that cannot be broken, regardless if under persecution of law. The first 10 amendments in the U.S. Constitution are called the Bill of Rights, which are basically our fundamental freedoms as U.S. citizens. These freedoms remain valid and intact as a defendant in the criminal law system. In fact, the 14th Amendment specifically acknowledges how the law must abide by these rights when prosecuting a suspected criminal. Furthermore, it guarantees all citizens equal protection of the law, regardless of age, class, status, income, race, religion, or ethnicity.

Fourteenth Amendment (1868)
“(…) nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law, nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.”

Additional Amendments to Be Grateful For

The 4th Amendment provides protection to citizens in the case of arrests, searches, and seizures. It prevents law enforcement from implementing unlawful searches and seizures of property, as well as, decrees the limitations and requirements for search warrants.

Fourth Amendment (1791)
“(…) The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause (…)”

The 5th Amendment is particularly important for those suspected of a crime. It mandates that all citizens due process of law, as well as, prohibits a person from being tried twice for the same crime, also known as “double jeopardy.” It also protects defendants from being forced to provide testimony against themselves. It protects much more too.

Fifth Amendment (1791)
“(…) nor shall [any person] be compelled in any criminal case to be a witness against himself.” This is often referred to as “pleading the fifth.”

The 6th Amendment involves your rights to a “speedy and public” trial. It also provides your rights to an attorney and a trial by an impartial jury. This includes being informed of your charges and the evidence against you, and being permitted to be present when witnesses are testifying against you. It also allows you to call witnesses to your defense.

Sixth Amendment (1791)
“(…) the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed.”

The 8th Amendment gives citizens protection against excessive bail. This means that bail must be set at a reasonable and consistent rate, and match the type of crime.

Eighth Amendment (1791)
“(…) Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.”

If You Are Facing Criminal Charges…

It is only natural that you are concerned about your rights, your freedom, and your future. You may be asking yourself what to expect, but rest assure that you will have the protection of your U.S. Constitutional rights during the entirety of the criminal justice process. But you can’t just rely on your Constitutional rights to protect your from being sentenced to the maximum penalties for your criminal charges. This is why it is vital to retain a trusted and experienced Indianapolis criminal defense lawyer to protect your rights and your freedoms.

Indianapolis Criminal Defense

Criminal Defense Lawyer Indianapolis Indiana

Criminal Defense Lawyer 317-636-7514

Call Attorney David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 for aggressive criminal defense in Indianapolis, Indiana. Our law firm offers free initial consultations to discuss the best strategies of defense for your case. We work around the clock to ensure your rights are protected and your freedoms are preserved. You CAN avoid the maximum penalties for your charges with our aggressive legal representation. Call 317-636-7514 to get started, today.

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Can I Request a New Public Defender?

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Facing criminal charges is scary, so it is understandable that you would want somebody working hard to protect your rights and your freedoms. When it comes to public defense, you may not be able to get the one-on-one, full-time attention you would normally get from a private criminal defense lawyer, but at least you are getting some sort of legal representation. Sometimes, using a public defender is not always a bad idea. For smaller cases that are considered petty or minor offenses, public defense may be all you need to avoid the maximum penalties for your criminal charges.

Regardless of the severity of criminal charges against you, if you were appointed a public defender that you are not comfortable with, you may have the option to request a new one. Continue reading to learn the general grounds for changing public defenders before your trial.

Swapping Public Defenders

If your public defender is difficult to work with, and you believe their professional behavior will have a negative effect on the outcome of your case, you are likely wishing you could have a new one. Unfortunately, swapping public defenders is not something that is regularly granted by the courts. A defendant must have sufficient cause and evidence to be appointed a new counselor. Here are some examples of what might be considered sufficient grounds to request a new public defender:

Your public defender is…

☛ frequently late or missing appointments;
☛ failing to meet deadlines for documents and paperwork;
☛ failing to inform you of your case status or court dates;
☛ trying to force you to enter a plea you do not want;
☛ ignoring or not using important case evidence;

How to Do it

If you insist on moving forward with changing your public defender, you need to start by taking detailed notes in a journal of your experiences with the attorney, and try to gather evidence, including things like pictures, mail, documents, and screen shots of texted conversations to prove their inadequacies.

Next, you need to contact the public defenders’ office and get the information you need from the office representative. You will have some paperwork to file to make a formal request. In some states, defendants are required to write the judge a letter requesting a new public defender and why. The public defenders’ office will let you know what you need to do in your state.

If you drop your public defender without asking a judge to appoint you a new one, you may not be able to get another one at all. In this case, you would have to represent yourself and risking being sentenced to the maximum penalties for your charges, or you could hire a private Indianapolis criminal defense attorney, instead.

Indianapolis Criminal Defense

Criminal Defense Lawyer Indianapolis Indiana

Criminal Defense Lawyer 317-636-7514

Call Attorney David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 for aggressive criminal defense in Indianapolis, Indiana. We work around the clock to ensure your rights are protected and your freedoms are preserved. Our law firm offers free initial consultations to discuss your case and the best strategies for defense.

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Understanding the Purpose of Arraignments in the Criminal Law Process

There are several stages to the criminal law process, including investigations, warrants, arrests, indictments, bail hearings, criminal discoveries, preliminary hearings, sentencings, appeals, and more. But when it comes to criminal court, the first step following an arrest is an arraignment. Although the nature and procedures for arraignments vary among jurisdictions and type of crime, they all serve the same agenda. Continue reading to learn more about arraignments and what to expect at yours or your loved one’s upcoming hearing.

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Arraignments

An arraignment is a fairly quick court hearing that is scheduled directly after a person’s arrest. When a person is arrested or a minor or non-violent crime, their bond amount is generally set at the time of arrest by the on-duty magistrate. This gives defendants the opportunity to post bond, get out of jail, and go on with their lives until they are notified by mail of their upcoming court hearing. This hearing is called an arraignment. For those arrested on more serious charges, and/or have several priors, they can be denied bail and must wait in jail until their scheduled bail hearing. Once their bail is decided on, the court hearings can begin, starting with the arraignment.

Their Purpose

Arraignments are fairly quick hearings that are generally over before a cup of coffee can go cold; however, they are one of the most crucial steps of the criminal law process for a defendant. Many things can take place at an arraignment, but the primary purpose is to notify the defendant of their rights in the criminal justice system, as well as the criminal charges against them, including the maximum penalties handed down upon a guilty verdict.

If a person has not been released from custody before their arraignment, it is common for their bail to be set at the same time since bail hearings are usually held around the same time as arraignments anyway. During an arraignment, it is also common for defendants to be given the opportunity to request public counsel; and if they qualify, the judge will approve it at the arraignment. Some jurisdictions will even request a defendant to enter an unofficial plea, even though it can be changed later on in the process.

Following an Arraignment

Once the arraignment takes place, the defendant receives a document as confirmation of initial hearing. This document proves that the defendant was read their rights and informed of their charges. From there, the rest of the criminal law process can take place. If a bail hearing has not already taken place, this could be the next step after arraignment. If bail has already been set, the next step is the criminal discovery process if it is permitted in their state. Otherwise, a preliminary hearing following by additional hearings, and then a sentencing trial is what generally comes next for a defendant.

Indianapolis Criminal Defense

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Talk to an Indianapolis criminal defense lawyer for qualified and proficient answers to your criminal law questions. If you are facing criminal charges in Indiana, you need an experienced and aggressive counselor in your corner fighting for your rights. David E. Lewis, Attorney at Law, is the criminal defense lawyer who will work around the clock to ensure your freedoms are preserved. Call 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation to discuss your case, today.

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Were You Accused of a Crime You Didn’t Commit?

If you were falsely accused of a crime, the first step to defending yourself is learning your rights.

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514


As a victim of a false criminal accusation, you are likely feeling a full fleet of emotions. Take comfort in knowing that your feelings of anger, frustration, confusion, and hopelessness are all normal reactions. After all, this is probably one of the most stressful situations you’ll face in your life. You can also take comfort in knowing that our legal system has a strict procedure in place to ensure defendants are not falsely accused of a crime; however, it cannot guarantee that it won’t happen. Unfortunately, being found guilty of a crime you are innocent of is a possibility, especially without aggressive criminal defense. There are people sitting in jail right now because they were falsely accused of a crime they did not commit.

Your Right to Counsel

As a defendant, you have the right to counsel, whether that be a court-ordered public defender, or a private criminal defense lawyer. In a case such as this, it is wise to hire privately to ensure you receive full-time, aggressive, and personalized criminal defense. Public lawyers have extreme workloads, and can only dedicate a certain amount of time for each case. A private lawyer, on the other hand, will have their full attention and focus on building you a strong and impactful defense. They are your best hope for getting your charges dismissed.

How to Prepare for Trial

While awaiting trial for a crime you did not commit, there are many things you can do to protect yourself and your case. To start, be sure you fully understand the seriousness of your situation. Do not make the mistake of being too confident. This is easy to do since you are in fact innocent, but there is a chance you could be convicted if you are not careful with your defense. You must take the legal process very seriously when accused of a crime you did not commit.

Next, be sure to budget for all the legal fees, attorney fees, and court costs you will be obligated to pay. The more serious the charge, the more time and money it will take to defend. This is especially true for false accusations of sexual or violent crimes, such as rape, child molestation, and domestic violence. Start budgeting costs now so that you are in better control later. Additional fees may include witness testimonies, expert testimonies, psychological testing, filing fees, and more.

Also, be sure you are documenting everything about your case. Write down everything you remember of the event in question. If you were not present, write down all the details of your whereabouts at the time the crime was committed. As the case progresses, continue to keep track of all events and new findings by writing them down in detail. This documentation can help your case down the line.

You need to also begin gathering all the evidence you have to prove your innocence, including a list of witnesses to testify on your behalf. On your list, record their name, and contact information, including their address, email, phone number, and work number. Be sure to also include a description of how they relate to the case and what information they offer as a witness.

Last, it is important to educate yourself as much as possible on everything pertaining to the case, including the laws surrounding your charges. Research persistently, because the more knowledge you have, the stronger your defense will be. Part of educating yourself also includes learning your rights. Talk to your Indianapolis criminal defense lawyer to be clear on what they are. For instance, if you are questioned by police, you have the right to remain silent. And if you are not being arrest (which you have the right to ask), you are free to leave at your own will.

Indianapolis Criminal Defense

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call Attorney David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 if you have been falsely accused of a crime. Our legal teams use an aggressive and concentrated approach to defend your rights and protect your reputation. We will stop at nothing to ensure your case is dismissed and your name is cleared. Call 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation to discuss your criminal charges, today.

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What is a No-Contest Plea?

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

When it comes to criminal cases, most of them end with a defendant accepting a plea bargain. This means instead of going to trial, a defendant pleads “guilty” to their criminal charges in exchange for an “incentive” from prosecution. Typically, this incentive involves recommending the judge to impose a lighter conviction or sentence, or even both. If a defendant denies a plea bargain and chooses to go to trial, they risk losing and being sentenced to the maximum punishment for their charges. The reason why many defendants accept guilt and choose a plea bargain is to avoid this risk altogether.

But not all cases end in plea bargains. There is something in the criminal justice world called a “nolo contendere” plea, which is a Latin phrase meaning, “I do not wish to contend.” This plea is more known as a “no contest” plea, and generally appeals to those who wish to avoid admission of fault in a civil or criminal case. And sometimes, prosecutors and judges are willing to accept this type of plea in particular circumstances.

Nolo Contendere

A “no contest” plea is essentially the same as a guilty plea since it comes with the same consequences. The only real difference is that the defendant is not admitting fault, but still accepting the conviction and subsequent penalties. The only benefit from a nolo contendere plea in a criminal case is personal integrity and satisfaction, and nothing else. However, in a civil case, no-contest pleas are beneficial for those who insist they are innocent of all allegations even though they cannot beat the evidence against them. Here is an example:

Tim and Richard are patrons at the local baseball game. They get into a physical altercation that ends with Richard striking Tim in the face, giving Tim a broken nose. The police are called to the scene and later on, Richard is prosecuted by the state for criminal assault. Separately, Tim hires a personal injury lawyer to file a third party civil suit against Richard to recover compensation for his losses and damages as a result of the broken nose. Since Richard is facing both criminal and civil cases, his lawyer would insist on allowing a no-contest plea for the criminal charge, so that Richard could evade liability in the civil lawsuit.

Defendants are not given the choice or right to enter a no-contest plea. It is up to the discretion of the judge to permit this type of non-admittance. And it is not a common allowance in criminal court. The laws surrounding nolo contendere pleas vary from state to state. If you have questions regarding plea deals in criminal cases, talk to your Indianapolis criminal defense attorney for details pertaining to your specific jurisdiction.

Call David E. Lewis, Attorney at Law, at 317-636-7514 for criminal defense in Indiana you can trust. Free initial consultations are waiting for you!

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Preliminary Hearing Process and Procedures

In last week’s blog, our readers were given a closer look at preliminary hearings. This week, we’ll dive a little deeper and discuss the general process and procedures you can expect. Continue reading to learn the basic steps to a preliminary hearing progression.

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Let’s Begin With an Example…

Let’s say that Dale is suspected of committing a crime, but he was out of town on a company trip during the time law enforcement states the crime was committed. A preliminary hearing takes place to determine if there is enough probable cause to charge him with the crime. At the preliminary hearing, Dale’s lawyer has a co-worker testify on Dale’s behalf as proof that he was out of town on a business trip. This testimony would prove that the investigator’s evidence against Dale is inaccurate. Afterwards, prosecution and defense will give their closing statements, and then the judge will determine whether or not the evidence shows that Dale likely committed the crime in question.

Preliminary Hearing Information

The process and procedures for preliminary hearings are very complex since they differ from state to state, and from case to case. A preliminary hearing can take place before or after a person has been arrested, or after charges are formally filed. Often times, they are not even required, especially for misdemeanor charges.

For defendants who are waiting in jail, a preliminary hearing must be held with 14 days. For those out on bond, the hearing must be held within 21 days. Again, these timelines can vary among jurisdictions. In some states, defendants must request preliminary hearings so long as a formal indictment hasn’t been filed; while in other states, defendants are given the option, but have the right to waive a preliminary hearing.

You must speak with a licensed criminal defense attorney who can educate you on the specific steps and procedures you can expect with your preliminary hearing. However, here are the basic steps to the preliminary hearing process:

1. Pre-Trial Court Appearance (Arraignment)

The court explains their charges and their right to counsel, advises them of their right to a preliminary hearing and trial, appoints them a lawyer (if requested), and bail is set.

2. Preliminary Hearing

The defendant is present at the hearing. The state presents evidence to a judge showing probable cause that the defendant committed a crime. The judge determines if the evidence is sufficient. If they decide it is not enough, the charges and the case are dismissed, and the defendant is released from custody or bond. If the judge decides there is enough probable cause, the defendant is “bound over” to the district or circuit court for trial. This simply means they are moved forward in the criminal justice system, and a trial date is set for them.

Are You Currently Facing Criminal Charges?

David E. Lewis Criminal Defense Attorney

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

If you do not already have a licensed criminal defense lawyer working on your case, you need one right away. Contact David E. Lewis, Attorney at Law, at 317-636-7514 to start building a strong and impactful defense against your criminal charges so that you have a chance at avoiding the maximum penalties for your suspected crimes. Our law firm offers free initial consultations, so there is no out-of-pocket obligations to you. Call 317-636-7514 and get started protecting your future, today.

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What is a Preliminary Hearing?

Before a person is even charged with a crime, it is common for a preliminary hearing to take place between judges and prosecution to determine whether or not there is sufficient probable cause to believe that the person in fact committed the crime in question. Preliminary hearings are also used for other legal purposes, as uses vary among jurisdictions; however, they are mostly to determine if probable cause exists in a criminal case. Continue reading to learn more about preliminary hearings.

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Preliminary Hearings

When law enforcement has good reason to believe that a person has committed a crime, this is called “probable cause.” For this reason, it is common for a preliminary hearing to occur before a person is charged with a crime. Essentially, preliminary hearings are the beginning of the indictment process for many criminal cases. Prosecution will build a case against a suspected defendant, and then bring it to a judge for approval to move forward with filing formal charges against the defendant.

If the judge agrees that there is enough probable cause, they approve the prosecution’s request to indict a person on particular criminal charges. Other times, preliminary hearings are held directly after a person’s arrest, but before charges are filed. These types of situations are eligible for expungement if a person was arrested but never charged with a crime.

It is important to know that law enforcement and prosecution do not have to prove that a defendant committed a crime; instead, they must only provide enough probable cause to convince a judge that the defendant has committed a crime and should be held in jail or restricted under bond. Here is an example:

A person is pulled over for erratic driving. Because the officer smells alcohol on the driver’s breath, they conduct a chemical test and a field sobriety test, which the driver fails. This evidence is presented to a judge at a preliminary hearing as probable cause that the defendant broke the law by operating a motor vehicle under the influence of alcohol. The judge agrees that the chemical test results show that the driver was operating a vehicle with a blood alcohol level higher than the state legal limit, and should be held over trial. As a result, the defendant moves forward in the criminal justice system.

In a preliminary hearing, it is possible for a judge to decide that there is not enough probable cause to file charges against a person. In this case, if a person has already been arrested, they are released from custody, whether that be jail or bond. If the person has not yet been arrested, nothing happens and no further legal actions are taken against them unless law enforcement finds more evidence to prove their case.

Check back next week to learn about the preliminary hearing process and procedure to finding probable cause!

Where to Find Aggressive Criminal Defense

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call Attorney David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 for aggressive criminal defense in Indianapolis, Indiana. Our criminal defense law firm offers free initial consultations to discuss the best strategies of defense for your case. Avoid the maximum penalties for your misdemeanor criminal charges by calling David E. Lewis, Attorney at Law, today!

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The Top Three Rules for Testifying in Court

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

If you must testify in court, it is in your best interest to learn exactly what you are to expect and how to conduct yourself. You can do this by discussing testimony tips with your trusted criminal defense lawyer. They have all the information you need to feel comfortable. In terms of rules and conduct, there are several to know. However, it is good to start with the 3 primary rules that will help protect yourself on the stand.

Continue reading to learn what these are rules are and how to prepare for your testimony.

➊ Understand the Question Asked

You cannot just listen to the questions asked by the attorneys. You must really pay attention so that you can fully understand what they are asking you. There is nothing wrong taking your time to think about it, or asking the attorney to repeat or reword the question. Furthermore, it is perfectly acceptable to simply say, “I do not know.” Never guess an answer. Sometimes, attorneys can use intimidation strategies that can cause stress and confusion. They may even attempt to embarrass you by having the courtroom recorder read back their last question. Just remember, this is a textbook tactic, so do not let it affect you. For this reason, it is important that you not respond to the manner in which the questions are asked. Instead, just focus on the actual questions and do not show emotions of frustration, anxiety, or anger. Your job is to simply understand the question and answer it the best you can.

➋ Only Answer the Question Asked

You do not want to divulge too much information. When asked a question by an attorney, only answer the question itself. Do not volunteer additional information. Not only does this protect you from incriminating yourself or the parties in question, it can mix you up in a web of confusing debates. For instance, if you are asked a “yes” or “no” question, only answer with one word and nothing else. Also, never answer a question with a question. This appear evasive, combative, and suspicious. Be professional, speak in your normal tone of voice, and act natural. Do not argue or present a challenge. This will only make things harder for you.

➌ Be Honest

Your job is to answer the questions, clearly, simply, and honestly. Always tell the truth because you are under oath. If somehow you are caught being misleading or dishonest, you could face criminal charges or be held in contempt of court. If a question is about you and your conduct in the past, do not try to downplay the incident or evade responsibility. Own up to it, be remorseful, and remain honest. This will make it harder for the attorney to come after you and make their point. The discomfort this may cause you is much easier than what could happen if you are caught lying.

Additional Tips That Are Vital to Your Testimony:

☛ Be on time;
☛ Dress professionally and conservatively;
☛ Be completely sober;
☛ Avoid words like “always” and “never” because it can box you in;
☛ Talk to your criminal defense attorney for the best testimony and courtroom advice;

Indianapolis Criminal Defense Lawyer

Criminal Defense Lawyer Indianapolis Indiana

Criminal Defense Lawyer 317-636-7514

Call David E. Lewis, Attorney at Law, at 317-636-7514 to get the aggressive Indianapolis criminal defense you need to avoid the maximum penalties for your charges in Indiana. We offer free initial consultations to discuss your charges and the best strategies for defense. Don’t fall victim to the maximum penalties for your criminal charges. Let our law firm fight for your rights and protect your freedoms.

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How Much Will it Cost to Hire a Defense Attorney?

If you are facing criminal charges, it is in your best interest to get in touch with a criminal defense lawyer as soon as possible. Not only will this better protect your rights and preserve your freedoms, it is the best strategy to avoid the maximum penalties for your offense. Many people are turned off, or stressed out, by the idea of having to hire a private lawyer because of budgeting reasons.

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514

Criminal Defense Law Firm 317-636-7514


The U.S. constitution may give you the right to public counsel, but this is not a great idea for anyone facing moderate to serious charges. Private Counsel is the best way to go if you want a better outcome and future for yourself. Don’t let money hold you back from moving forward with a happy and healthy, stress-free life. You simply cannot put a price on security and contentment. Continue reading to learn how lawyer costs are arranged, and what to expect to pay for your defense.

Variables That Influence Lawyer Costs

There are several factors that influence the amount of money it will cost to retain criminal defense. These factors are further varied depending on the state you live in and the local jurisdiction. Here are the primary factors, but not all, that impact the final cost of legal representation:

✦ Client’s Income – Your personal income determines whether or not you are eligible for public, court-ordered legal representation. However, sometimes your income can also influence how much a private criminal defense lawyer chooses to charge you for their service. You never know unless you ask.

✦ Investigatory Process – Depending on the severity of the crime and the seriousness of the case, your criminal defense lawyer may need to implement a certain level of investigation, including hiring experts, psychologists, doctors, researchers, chemical testing, travel expenses, and more. These costs will be added to a final bill.

✦ Lawyer Fees – A criminal defense attorney’s private rates are a key part of the total cost of legal representation. These fees will vary from law firm to law firm, as well as, lawyer to lawyer. They will also vary depending on several other factors, such as the skills and experience of the attorney, the severity of the crime, the complexity of the case, whether the case goes to trial or not, and more. Very few criminal defense lawyers charge a flat-rate fee for their services, unless it is a quick, open and close case, such as a traffic ticket.

Average Costs

Most criminal defense lawyers charge hourly, meaning every hour they spend on your case is billed to you. With all of the above-mentioned factors, you can expect your total cost of legal representation to range between $1000 and $4000, give or take. For more serious, lengthy cases, it can exceed $20,000 or more. Your criminal lawyer will be happy to discuss the expected total costs of their services upfront. Use an initial consultation to learn this information and prepare yourself for criminal defense.

An Indianapolis Criminal Defense Attorney You Can Trust

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law

David E. Lewis Attorney at Law 317-636-7514

Call Attorney David E. Lewis at 317-636-7514 to schedule a free initial consultation to discuss your criminal charges with a seasoned Indianapolis criminal defense attorney you can trust. We work around the clock to ensure your rights are protected and your freedoms are preserved. You can avoid the maximum penalties for your charges with our aggressive legal representation! Call 317-636-7514 to get started, today.

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